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Traveling Waves: Crash Course Physics #17
 
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Get Your Crash Course Physics Mug here: https://store.dftba.com/products/crashcourse-physics-mug Waves are cool. The more we learn about waves, the more we learn about a lot of things in physics. Everything from earthquakes to music! Ropes can tell us a lot about how traveling waves work so, in this episode of Crash Course Physics, Shini uses ropes (and animated ropes) to talk about how waves carry energy and how different kinds of waves transmit energy differently. -- Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 751169 CrashCourse
Sound & Light Travel in Waves
 
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In this experiment, Jared teaches us about sound and light waves using a physical model of a wave, and an online learning tool from PhET. You can try out this learning tool by clicking on this link: https://bit.ly/2vJJ1I6 Are you a teacher? Click this link for free teaching resources related to this topic: https://sites.google.com/temple.edu/funscience/home You can learn more about sound and light waves at https://bit.ly/2KeayY6. It's a link to our companion website new.learningscience.org/wp where you'll find lots of fun, interactive science sites for kids. Check out more videos like this on our channel FunScienceDemos, and do not forget to subscribe and click the bell to stay updated on new videos! https://bit.ly/16zEpWc
Views: 181564 funsciencedemos
Science - Transmission of Sound
 
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This Eureka.in Physics video shows how sound travels through the various states of matter, significance of Vibrations in the traveling of sound energy and the various type of sound waves. It also discusses about the measurement of sound and the concept of echo. You can also download our free app that covers all this and a glossary of key terms, and a quiz to test your knowledge on this topic here: http://bit.ly/14ttWKA Visit us at http://www.designmate.com For fun and educational updates, like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Designmate.Eureka Designmate Eureka is a unique channel that has Science & Mathematics videos from our Award winning K-12 product Eureka.in. These videos are available in multiple languages. If you would like to view more of our Videos or have a look at any specific topic do leave a comment.
Electromagnetic Spectrum: Radio Waves
 
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http://www.facebook.com/ScienceReason ... [email protected]: EMS Electromagnetic Spectrum (Episode 2) - Radio Waves The electromagnetic spectrum is the range of all possible frequencies of electromagnetic radiation. The "electromagnetic spectrum" of an object is the characteristic distribution of electromagnetic radiation emitted or absorbed by that particular object. --- Please SUBSCRIBE to Science & Reason: • http://www.youtube.com/Best0fScience • http://www.youtube.com/ScienceTV • http://www.youtube.com/FFreeThinker --- MEASURING THE ELECTROMAGNETIC SPECTRUM The electromagnetic (EM) spectrum is just a name that scientists give a bunch of types of radiation when they want to talk about them as a group. Radiation is energy that travels and spreads out as it goes - visible light that comes from a lamp in your house and radio waves that come from a radio station are two types of electromagnetic radiation. Other examples of EM radiation are microwaves, infrared and ultraviolet light, X-rays and gamma-rays. Hotter, more energetic objects and events create higher energy radiation than cool objects. Only extremely hot objects or particles moving at very high velocities can create high-energy radiation like X-rays and gamma-rays. • http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/science/know_l1/emspectrum.html --- RADIO WAVES Radio waves are a type of electromagnetic radiation with wavelengths in the electromagnetic spectrum longer than infrared light. Like all other electromagnetic waves, they travel at the speed of light. Naturally-occurring radio waves are made by lightning, or by astronomical objects. Artificially-generated radio waves are used for fixed and mobile radio communication, broadcasting, radar and other navigation systems, satellite communication, computer networks and innumerable other applications. Different frequencies of radio waves have different propagation characteristics in the Earth's atmosphere; long waves may cover a part of the Earth very consistently, shorter waves can reflect off the ionosphere and travel around the world, and much shorter wavelengths bend or reflect very little and travel on a line of sight. Discovery and utilization: Radio waves were first predicted by mathematical work done in 1865 by James Clerk Maxwell. Maxwell noticed wavelike properties of light and similarities in electrical and magnetic observations. He then proposed equations, that described light waves and radio waves as waves of electromagnetism that travel in space. In 1887, Heinrich Hertz demonstrated the reality of Maxwell's electromagnetic waves by experimentally generating radio waves in his laboratory. Many inventions followed, making practical the use of radio waves to transfer information through space. Propagation: The study of electromagnetic phenomena such as reflection, refraction, polarization, diffraction and absorption is of critical importance in the study of how radio waves move in free space and over the surface of the Earth. Different frequencies experience different combinations of these phenomena in the Earth's atmosphere, making certain radio bands more useful for specific purposes than others. Radio communication: In order to receive radio signals, for instance from AM/FM radio stations, a radio antenna must be used. However, since the antenna will pick up thousands of radio signals at a time, a radio tuner is necessary to tune in to a particular frequency (or frequency range). This is typically done via a resonator (in its simplest form, a circuit with a capacitor and an inductor). The resonator is configured to resonate at a particular frequency (or frequency band), thus amplifying sine waves at that radio frequency, while ignoring other sine waves. Usually, either the inductor or the capacitor of the resonator is adjustable, allowing the user to change the frequency at which it resonates. In medicine: Radio frequency (RF) energy has been used in medical treatments for over 75 years generally for minimally invasive surgeries and coagulation, including the treatment of sleep apnea. • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radio_waves .
Views: 402082 Best0fScience
Light Is Waves: Crash Course Physics #39
 
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The way light behaves can seem very counter intuitive, and many physicists would agree with that, but once you figure out light waves it all starts to make more sense! In this episode of Crash Course Physics, Shini shows us how we know that light exists as a wave and why that's really cool! Want more Crash Course in person? We'll be at NerdCon: Nerdfighteria in Boston on February 25th and 26th! For more information, go to http://www.nerdconnerdfighteria.com/ *** Get your own Crash Course Physics mug from DFTBA: http://store.dftba.com/products/crash... The Latest from PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list... -- Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 485653 CrashCourse
How Information Travels Wirelessly
 
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Understanding how we use electromagnetic waves to transmit information. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://k12videos.mit.edu/terms-conditions
Views: 187172 MITK12Videos
Traveling Waves
 
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114 - Traveling Waves In this video Paul Andersen explains how traveling waves move through space and time. The reflection and interference of traveling waves can create standing waves which appear motionless. Examples of traveling waves in one and two dimensions are included. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ Music Attribution Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: Adjwilley. English: The Sum (blue) of Two Sine Waves (red, Green) Is Shown as One of the Waves Increases in Frequency. The Two Waves Are Initially Identical, Then the Frequency of the Green Wave Is Gradually Increased by 25%. Constructive and Destructive Interference Can Be Seen., February 4, 2013. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:WaveInterference.gif. “Interference (wave Propagation).” Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia, April 3, 2015. http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Interference_(wave_propagation)&oldid=654718966. Rowley, Jeff. 30 March 2012, March 30, 2012. Jeff Rowley Big Wave Surfer 2012 Finalist Billabong XXL Big Wave Awards Ride of Year Xvolution Media. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Jeff_Rowley_Big_Wave_Surfer_2012_Finalist_Billabong_XXL_Big_Wave_Awards_Ride_of_Year_Xvolution_Media_-_Flickr_-_Jeff_Rowley_Big_Wave_Surfer.jpg. Shacktown123. English: Jeff Rowley, Big Wave Surfer and Professional Athlete Charges Jaws Peahi Solo on Thanksgiving 2012 on His Channel Islands 12 Footer Gun, December 23, 2012. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Jeff_Rowley_Jaws_Peahi_Maui_Paddle_In_Big_Wave_Surfing_Red_Bull_Jaws_9.jpg. “Wave on a String.” PhET. Accessed April 20, 2015. https://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/wave-on-a-string.
Views: 42442 Bozeman Science
Sound: Crash Course Physics #18
 
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Get Your Crash Course Physics Mug here: https://store.dftba.com/products/crashcourse-physics-mug We learn a lot about our surroundings thanks to sound. But... what is it exactly? Sound, that is. What is sound? And how does it travel? And what is this Doppler Effect that we've heard so much about? In this episode of Crash Course Physics, Shini goes over some of the basics (and some of the not so basics) of the Physics of Sound. -- Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 675051 CrashCourse
Standing waves on strings | Physics | Khan Academy
 
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In this video David explains how and why standing waves occur, and well as how to determine the wavelengths for a standing wave on a string. Created by David SantoPietro. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/physics/mechanical-waves-and-sound/standing-waves/v/standing-waves-in-tubes-part-1?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=physics Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/physics/mechanical-waves-and-sound/standing-waves/v/constructive-and-destructive-interference?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=physics Physics on Khan Academy: Physics is the study of the basic principles that govern the physical world around us. We'll start by looking at motion itself. Then, we'll learn about forces, momentum, energy, and other concepts in lots of different physical situations. To get the most out of physics, you'll need a solid understanding of algebra and a basic understanding of trigonometry. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Physics channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0oGarQW2lE5PxhGoQAKV7Q?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 268830 Khan Academy Physics
Wave motion | Waves | Physics | FuseSchool
 
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All waves can transfer energy from one place to another without transferring any matter. This is done by a series of disturbances or vibrations that carry the energy. Just like the people in their seats, only moving up and down when it’s their turn. Waves can transfer energy through solids, liquids, gases and empty spaces – otherwise known as vacuums. There are two types of waves – which we will look at in more detail in another video, but the basic features are the same. The frequency of a wave is the number of complete waves passing a fixed point in a given amount of time. This time period is usually one second. Frequency is given the symbol f and is measured in units called Hertz. Hertz measure how many complete cycles per second; so how many people in our Mexican wave stand up every second. The frequency and period are often confused. The frequency refers to how often something happens, whereas the period refers to the time it takes to happen. The period of a wave is the time for one complete cycle. So the time taken for one person to stand up, wave and sit down. This would be measured in seconds. When something happens repeatedly we say that the event is periodic and refer to the time for the event to repeat itself. The period of the earth to orbit the sun is 365 days, the period of a day is 24 hours, the period of a typical class at school is 45 minutes. Now for the wavelength… the wavelength is the distance between a point on one wave and the same point on the next wave, for example two peaks or two troughs. Wavelength is given the symbol Lambda from the Greek letter, and is usually measured in metres. Wavelengths can vary hugely in size, x-rays are very short, visible light is here and FM radiowaves are much longer. So we’ve looked at the frequency, period and wavelength so far. Let’s finish with amplitude. As waves travel, they create disturbance. The amplitude of a wave is the distance from the maximum disturbance to its undisturbed position. Think of a very flat sea… and then an incoming wave. The amplitude is the height of the top of the wave from the flat sea. In another video we’ll be looking at the wave speed equation, and connecting wavelengths and frequencies: Wave Equation For now you just need to know what these 4 keys words mean. Frequency, period, wavelength, amplitude SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
ScienceMan Digital Lesson - Physics - How Sound Waves Travel
 
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ScienceMan.com provides free digital lessons and technology integration help for teachers and students. In this digital lesson, ScienceMan discusses how sound waves travel from place to place. ScienceMan™ and ScienceMan Digital Lessons are protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
Views: 98158 ScienceMandotcom
The Electromagnetic Spectrum
 
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http://www.facebook.com/ScienceReason ... [email protected]: EMS (Episode 1) - An Introduction To The Electromagnetic Spectrum --- Please SUBSCRIBE to Science & Reason: • http://www.youtube.com/Best0fScience • http://www.youtube.com/ScienceTV • http://www.youtube.com/FFreeThinker --- Measuring the electromagnetic spectrum You actually know more about it than you may think! The electromagnetic (EM) spectrum is just a name that scientists give a bunch of types of radiation when they want to talk about them as a group. Radiation is energy that travels and spreads out as it goes-- visible light that comes from a lamp in your house and radio waves that come from a radio station are two types of electromagnetic radiation. Other examples of EM radiation are microwaves, infrared and ultraviolet light, X-rays and gamma-rays. Hotter, more energetic objects and events create higher energy radiation than cool objects. Only extremely hot objects or particles moving at very high velocities can create high-energy radiation like X-rays and gamma-rays. The different types of radiation in the EM spectrum, in order from lowest energy to highest: Radio: Yes, this is the same kind of energy that radio stations emit into the air for your boom box to capture and turn into your favorite Mozart, Madonna, or Justin Timberlake tunes. But radio waves are also emitted by other things ... such as stars and gases in space. You may not be able to dance to what these objects emit, but you can use it to learn what they are made of. Microwaves: They will cook your popcorn in just a few minutes! Microwaves in space are used by astronomers to learn about the structure of nearby galaxies, and our own Milky Way! Infrared: Our skin emits infrared light, which is why we can be seen in the dark by someone using night vision goggles. In space, IR light maps the dust between stars. Visible: Yes, this is the part that our eyes see. Visible radiation is emitted by everything from fireflies to light bulbs to stars ... also by fast-moving particles hitting other particles. Ultraviolet: We know that the Sun is a source of ultraviolet (or UV) radiation, because it is the UV rays that cause our skin to burn! Stars and other "hot" objects in space emit UV radiation. X-rays: Your doctor uses them to look at your bones and your dentist to look at your teeth. Hot gases in the Universe also emit X-rays . Gamma-rays: Radioactive materials (some natural and others made by man in things like nuclear power plants) can emit gamma-rays. Big particle accelerators that scientists use to help them understand what matter is made of can sometimes generate gamma-rays. But the biggest gamma-ray generator of all is the Universe! It makes gamma radiation in all kinds of ways. • http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/science/know_l1/emspectrum.html .
Views: 1273919 Best0fScience
What Does Sound Look Like? | SKUNK BEAR
 
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You can actually see sound waves as they travel through the air thanks to a clever photographic trick. tumblr.com/follow/skunkbear skunkbear.tumblr.com Twitter: @cadamole @nprscience Produced by Adam Cole Hands shot by Meg Vogel Schlieren images provided by Mike Hargather (http://infohost.nmt.edu/~mjh/people.html) Amber Kates Bobby Gold J. W. Tang, A. Nicolle and J. Pantelic MUSIC: "Eileen" by Lee Rosevere http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Lee_Rosevere/Music_for_MOBA/LeeRosevere_MOBA_09-Eileen
Views: 1637249 NPR
PROPAGATION OF ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES PART 01
 
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For more information: http://www.7activestudio.com [email protected] http://www.7activemedical.com/ [email protected] http://www.sciencetuts.com/ [email protected] Contact: +91- 9700061777, +91- 9100061777 7 Active Technology Solutions Pvt.Ltd. is an educational 3D digital content provider for K-12. We also customise the content as per your requirement for companies platform providers colleges etc . 7 Active driving force "The Joy of Happy Learning" -- is what makes difference from other digital content providers. We consider Student needs, Lecturer needs and College needs in designing the 3D & 2D Animated Video Lectures. We are carrying a huge 3D Digital Library ready to use. PROPAGATION OF ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES:In communication using radio waves, an antenna at the transmitter radiates the Electromagnetic waves EM waves, which travel through the space and reach the receiving antenna at the other end. As the EM wave travels away from the transmitter, the strength of the wave keeps on decreasing. Several factors influence the propagation of EM waves and the path they follow. At this point, it is also important to understand the composition of the earth’s atmosphere as it plays a vital role in the propagation of EM waves. A brief discussion on some useful layers of the atmosphere is given in Table. Ground wave: To radiate signals with high efficiency, the antennas should have a size comparable to the wavelength of the signal at least /4. At longer wavelengths i.e., at lower frequencies, the antennas have large physical size and they are located on or very near to the ground. In standard AM broadcast, ground based vertical towers are generally used as transmitting antennas. For such antennas, ground has a strong influence on the propagation of the signal. The mode of propagation is called surface wave propagation and the wave glides over the surface of the earth. A wave induces current in the ground over which it passes and it is attenuated as a result of absorption of energy by the earth. The attenuation of surface waves increases very rapidly with increase in frequency. The maximum range of coverage depends on the transmitted power and frequency less than a few MHz. Sky waves:In the frequency range from a few MHz up to 30 to 40 MHz, long distance communication can be achieved by ionospheric reflection of radio waves back towards the earth. This mode of propagation is called sky wave propagation and is used by short wave broadcast services. The ionosphere is so called because of the presence of a large number of ions or charged particles. It extends from a height of ~65 Km to about 400 Km above the earth’s surface. Ionisation occurs due to the absorption of the ultraviolet and other high-energy radiation coming from the sun by air molecules. The ionosphere is further subdivided into several layers, the details of which are given in Table. The degree of ionisation varies with the height. The density of atmosphere decreases with height. At great heights the solar radiation is intense but there are few molecules to be ionised. Close to the earth, even though the molecular concentration is very high, the radiation intensity is low so that the ionisation is again low. However, at some intermediate heights, there occurs a peak of ionisation density. The ionospheric layer acts as a reflector for a certain range of frequencies 3 to 30 MHz.Electromagnetic waves of frequencies higher than 30 MHz penetrate the ionosphere and escape. These phenomena are shown in the Figure. The phenomenon of bending of EM waves so that they are diverted towards the earth is similar to total internal reflection in optics.
Views: 214034 7activestudio
GCSE Physics - Water Waves - Shallow to Deep Water
 
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This tutorial is about how waves can speed up or slow down when then enter a material with a different optical density, or when water waves enter regions of different depths. This change of velocity can cause the waves to change direction - this is called REFRACTION. Subscribe for more physics tutorials like this: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-Physics-Ninja Water waves will refract when then move from shallow to deep water causing them to speed up. As a result, their wavelength will increase and the refracted ray will 'SPEED AWAY' from the normal line. Remember that the wavefronts are always at 90 degrees to the ray. Use 'RNAR' to work through the steps: 1. Ray (incident ray) 2. Normal (line perpendicular to surface where the ray enters) 3. Angles (label the angle of incident and angle of refraction) 4. Use the refraction rule "SPEED AWAY" to determine which direction the refracted ray will bend. Quick question: During refraction, the wavelength and the speed of the wave changes. What does NOT change about the wave? (Answer... the frequency of the wave does not change) So why do waves get faster in deeper water? The answer is a bit complex, but here is an explanation posted at the Illinois Department of Physics: 1. For a shallow fluid, the motion of the fluid is mostly side-to-side. 2. In order to accumulate more fluid in one place (to make the crest of the wave), each little bit of fluid must travel a little farther than it would have to in deeper water. 3. When a wave passes, the bits of fluid (if you could watch one at a time) travel in ellipses. For shallow water, the ellipses are stretched out horizontally, and in very deep water, they are very nearly circular. 4. So for a wave of the same height (top to bottom of the ellipse), the bits of water must travel farther in the shallow tray than the deep tray. 5. Because the waves of the same height in shallow and deep water exert the same pressure differences due to gravity to get the water moving (although the motion is different due to the fact that the bottom is there), similar forces push and pull on the water. 6. To get the water moving farther and faster with the same force takes a longer time for each push, and hence a slower speed for the wave which travels in the shallow water. " (From https://van.physics.illinois.edu/qa/listing.php?id=2223) For more physics flashcards and tutorials visit https://gcsephysicsninja.com/product/waves-flashcards/
Views: 37166 GCSE Physics Ninja
Sound for Kids - Sound Waves and Vibrations
 
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The best and the biggest channel for science videos for kids. Kindergarten,preschoolers ,primary school kids can learn about the basics of sound with help of this animated education video. How sound is produced, how sound travels,what are sound waves and what are vibrations, all elementary questions are answered in an interesting and creative way.
Views: 665923 makemegenius
Frequency, Wavelength, and the Speed of Light | a video course made easy by Crash Chemistry Academy
 
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This video describes what frequency is, how it is measured, how frequency and wavelength are related visually and mathematically, and derives the mathematical relationship between frequency, wavelength, and the speed of light CC Academy videos are easy 101 crash course tutorials for step by step Chemistry help on your chemistry homework, problems, and experiments. Check out our best lessons: - Solution Stoichiometry Tutorial: How to use Molarity - Stoichiometry - Quantum Numbers - Rutherford's Gold Foil Experiment, Explained - Covalent Bonding Tutorial: Covalent vs. Ionic bonds - Metallic Bonding and Metallic Properties Explained: Electron Sea Model - Effective Nuclear Charge, Shielding, and Periodic Properties - Electron Configuration Tutorial + How to Derive Configurations from Periodic Table - Orbitals, the Basics: Atomic Orbital Tutorial — probability, shapes, energy - Metric Prefix Conversions Tutorial - Gas Law Practice Problems: Boyle's Law, Charles Law, Gay Lussac's, Combined Gas Law —More on Light | Wiki— "Light is electromagnetic radiation within a certain portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. The word usually refers to visible light, which is visible to the human eye and is responsible for the sense of sight.[1] Visible light is usually defined as having wavelengths in the range of 400–700 nanometres (nm), or 4.00 × 10−7 to 7.00 × 10−7 m, between the infrared (with longer wavelengths) and the ultraviolet (with shorter wavelengths).[2][3] This wavelength means a frequency range of roughly 430–750 terahertz (THz). The main source of light on Earth is the Sun. Sunlight provides the energy that green plants use to create sugars mostly in the form of starches, which release energy into the living things that digest them. This process of photosynthesis provides virtually all the energy used by living things. Historically, another important source of light for humans has been fire, from ancient campfires to modern kerosene lamps. With the development of electric lights and power systems, electric lighting has effectively replaced firelight. Some species of animals generate their own light, a process called bioluminescence. For example, fireflies use light to locate mates, and vampire squids use it to hide themselves from prey. The primary properties of visible light are intensity, propagation direction, frequency or wavelength spectrum, and polarization, while its speed in a vacuum, 299,792,458 metres per second, is one of the fundamental constants of nature. Visible light, as with all types of electromagnetic radiation (EMR), is experimentally found to always move at this speed in a vacuum.[citation needed] In physics, the term light sometimes refers to electromagnetic radiation of any wavelength, whether visible or not.[4][5] In this sense, gamma rays, X-rays, microwaves and radio waves are also light. Like all types of light, visible light is emitted and absorbed in tiny "packets" called photons and exhibits properties of both waves and particles. This property is referred to as the wave–particle duality. The study of light, known as optics, is an important research area in modern physics." Wikipedia contributors. "Light." Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia, 5 Jun. 2016. Web. 18 Jun. 2016.
Views: 162710 Crash Chemistry Academy
What Is The Speed of Dark?
 
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twitter: http://www.twitter.com/tweetsauce instagram: http://www.instagram.com/electricpants facebook: http://www.facebook.com/VsauceGaming SOURCES BELOW: this is the video where I talk about THE SPEED OF PUSH: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Do1lm9IevYE Big thanks to Martin Archer for help with this episode: http://www.martinarcher.co.uk/ And thanks to Guy Larsen for his shadow magic: https://twitter.com/guylar music by http://www.YouTube.com/JakeChudnow and http://www.audionetwork.com shadows faster than light: http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/physics/Relativity/SpeedOfLight/FTL.html#3 http://physics.stackexchange.com/questions/63434/could-the-shadow-move-with-faster-than-light-speed http://www.madsci.org/posts/archives/2000-02/950834634.Ph.q.html making the moon brighter: http://what-if.xkcd.com/13/ sunset and earth’s shadow and belt of venus in single pics: http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap131024.html http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap100729.html amounts of evening-types in a city: http://weatherspark.com/averages/33125/Honolulu-Hawaii-United-States superluminal scissors: http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/physics/Relativity/SR/scissors.html http://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/archive/index.php/t-69757.html wave animations: http://www.ablongman.com/mullin/AnimationPages/FigsI-19&20.html http://www.acs.psu.edu/drussell/Demos/SWR/SWR.html http://resource.isvr.soton.ac.uk/spcg/tutorial/tutorial/Tutorial_files/Web-inter-superp.htm phase velocity vs. group velocity: http://resource.isvr.soton.ac.uk/spcg/tutorial/tutorial/Tutorial_files/Web-further-dispersive.htm faster than light dark patches: http://www.askamathematician.com/2013/02/q-is-darkness-a-wave-the-way-light-is-a-wave-what-is-the-speed-of-dark/ http://www.physicsclassroom.com/class/light/Lesson-3/The-Path-Difference make a light interference pattern at home: http://www.exploratorium.edu/snacks/diffraction/ http://www.instructables.com/id/How-to-perform-Interference-and-Diffranction-at-Ho/ the speed of ignorance: http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2012/04/02/stuart-firestein-ignorance-science/ http://philosophicalfallibilism.blogspot.com/2009_03_20_archive.html http://kk.org/thetechnium/2008/10/the-expansion-o/ http://louisecharente.wordpress.com/2013/10/24/the-discovery-of-ignorance/ Dunning-Kruger: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/david-macaray/the-dunningkruger-effect_b_4476166.html http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/McArthur_Wheeler “animalcules”: http://www.leben.us/index.php/component/content/article/59-volume-3-issue-4/236-antoni-van-leeuwenhoeks-amazing-little-animalcules
Views: 13964613 Vsauce
Electromagnetic Waves
 
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124 - Electromagnetic Waves In this video Paul Andersen details the characteristics of electromagnetic waves. Electromagnetic waves are transverse waves that can move through both mediums and vacuums. The electric and magnetic fields oscillate perpendicular to the wave direction. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ Music Attribution Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: “Electromagnetic Radiation.” Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia, May 2, 2015. http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Electromagnetic_radiation&oldid=660494482. ESO. English: Artist’s Impression of How Type Ia Supernovae May Look like as Revealed by Spectro-Polarimetry Observations. The Outer Regions of the Blast Cloud Is Asymmetric, with Different Materials Found in “Clumps”, While the Inner Regions Are Smooth. Using Observations of 17 Supernovae Made over More than 10 Years with ESO’s Very Large Telescope and the McDonald Observatory’s Otto Struve Telescope, Astronomers Inferred the Shape and Structure of the Debris Cloud Thrown out from Type Ia Supernovae. Such Supernovae Are Thought to Be the Result of the Explosion of a Small and Dense Star — a White Dwarf — inside a Binary System. As Its Companion Continuously Spills Matter onto the White Dwarf, the White Dwarf Reaches a Critical Mass, Leading to a Fatal Instability and the Supernova. But What Sparks the Initial Explosion, and How the Blast Travels through the Star Have Long Been Thorny Issues. The Study Shows That the Outer Regions of the Blast Cloud Is Asymmetric, with Different Materials Found in “Clumps”, While the Inner Regions Are Smooth., November 30, 2006. http://www.eso.org/public/images/eso0644a/. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Artist%27s_impression_of_how_Type_Ia_supernovae_may_look_like_as_revealed_by_spectro-polarimetry_observations.jpg. Esquembre, Lookang many thanks to Fu-Kwun Hwang and author of Easy Java Simulation = Francisco. English: Electromagnetic Waves Can Be Imagined as a Self-Propagating Transverse Oscillating Wave of Electric and Magnetic Fields. This Diagram Shows a Plane Linearly Polarized Wave Propagating from Left to Right. The Electric Field Is in a Vertical Plane and the Magnetic Field in a Horizontal Plane., October 5, 2011. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Electromagneticwave3Dfromside.gif. McLassus, Roger. Deutsch: Das Bild Zeigt Eine Realistische Störung Der Wasseroberfläche (durch Kurzes Eintauchen Eines Stabes) Und Die Ausbreitung Dieser Störung Durch Kreiswellen von Eingeschränkter Konzentrizität Und Deren Überlagerungen. Der Flache Beleuchtungswinkel Gibt Dem Wasser Ein Fast Metallisches Aussehen.English: Surface Waves of Water: Expansion of a Disturbance. – It Shows a Realistic Disturbance (caused by Shortly Dipping a Stick into the Water) and Its Expansion Forming Interfering Circles of Limited Concentricity. The near Metallic Appearance of the Water’s Surface Is due to the Small Angle of illumination.Español: Ondas Superficiales En El Agua: Expansión de Una Perturbación. – Muestra Una Representación Realista de Una Perturbación (causada Por Sumergir Por Un Instante Un Palito En El Agua) Y Su Expansión Formando Círculos Concéntricos Que Interfieren. La Apariencia Metálica de La Superficie Del Agua Se Debe Al Bajo Ángulo En La iluminación.Français : Ondes de Surface Sur de L’eau : L’expansion D’une Perturbation. On Observe Une Perturbation Réaliste (due À Un Bâton) et Son Expansion Sous La Forme D’ondes Interférentes et Grossièrement Concentriques. L’aspect Quasi Métallique de L’eau Est Dû À Une Lumière rasante.Português: Ondas de Superfície de Água: A Expansão de Um Distúrbio. É Mostrada a Perturbação Realística (causada Por Um Bastão) E Sua Expansão Formando Círculos de Interferência Aproximadamente Concêntricos. A Aparência Metálica Da Superfície É Resultante Do Baixo Ângulo de Iluminação., January 14, 2006. picture taken by Roger McLassus (improved by DemonDeLuxe, Sep 2006). http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:2006-01-14_Surface_waves.jpg. “Photon.” Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia, May 1, 2015. http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Photon&oldid=660185835. “Sun.” Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia, May 5, 2015. http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Sun&oldid=660992057.
Views: 121145 Bozeman Science
What Is Light?
 
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We are so used to some things that we stopped wondering about them. Like light. What is light? Some kind of wavy thing, right? Kind of. Short bonus video for the people waiting for new stuff. Music by: https://soundcloud.com/epicmountain/light https://epicmountainmusic.bandcamp.com/track/light www.epic-mountain.com Our Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/Kurzgesagt?ty=h Visit us on reddit/facebook/twitter. You know. Social media stuff. https://www.reddit.com/r/kurzgesagt http://kurzgesagt.org https://www.facebook.com/Kurzgesagt https://twitter.com/Kurz_Gesagt THANKS A LOT TO OUR LOVELY PATRONS FOR SUPPORTING US: Phiroze Dalal, T0T0S, Ryan OHoro, Kay Brinkmann, A La Mode, Marcelo Fernandes de Souza Filho, Vince, Thomas Shiels, Tom Wardrop, Shawn Marincas, Pontus Attåsen, Paul, Horacio Medina, Jim Yang, Arnav Guleria, Clemens, Robert McKone, Tahseen Mushtaque, Todd Binkley, Jochen, Vahur S, Matthew von der Ahe, Thomas Russell, Erick, Vivek Kotecha, Nils Caspar, Holger Fassel, Artur Szczypta, Jeff Fellows, Daniel Duffee, Konstantin Shabashov, Jackson R Hanna, Tim drake, Pascal de Reuck, Mike Galles, ByeongWook Lee, Guus Ketelings, Franko Papić, Thalia, Narat Suchartsunthorn, Lorenz Zahn, Brian Aparicio, Jörg Vogelsang, Rashed Ali, Darwin Ranzone, Tyler Thornton, Bernat Unanue, David Pfister, Ash Patel, Han Saini, Ute Moll, Vrm Vee Are Em, Ioanna Bischinioti, Jenny Zhou, Vince Babbra, Dan Cortes, Matt K What is light? Help us caption & translate this video! http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?c=UCsXVk37bltHxD1rDPwtNM8Q&tab=2
Energy in Waves: A Transfer Story (Spaced Out: A Cosmic Scene)
 
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www.woub.org/spacedout This episode focuses on the transfer of energy by waves. Students will be intrigued with the power of energy waves as they view demonstrations not easily replicated in a typical classroom. They are provided examples of energy waves and are drawn into a discussion on a couple of ways to observe that energy is being transferred by a wave. Spaced Out: A Cosmic Scene Have you ever questioned how astronomers and physicists know so much about the Universe? Can you explain and demonstrate how light and sound waves carry energy? Spaced Out: A Cosmic Scene tackles these questions and many more in a humorous and entertaining fashion while conveying insights into the study of astronomy and the physics of waves. Spaced Out: A Cosmic Scene is a Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) project funded by eTech Ohio and produced by the WOUB Center for Public Media at Ohio University, Athens. This web-based multimedia project consists of eight science and mathematics student video-on-demand modules for at-risk students in grades 8-10, and includes eight teacher self-study video support modules with assessment strategies. All content is aligned with the Ohio Academic Content Standards for physics and astronomy. The student modules are designed to stimulate and inculcate higher order thinking skills, innate curiosity, and inquiry-based learning. Each student module focuses on specific key concepts: waves carry energy; waves transfer energy; size of the cosmos; measuring distances in space; scale modeling of the solar system; predictable motion of the earth and moon; stellar finger print; brief history of astronomy; and, the formation of all the elements. Intended to be utilized both independently by students with teacher oversight, and as a teaching-learning experience for an entire class, Spaced Out: A Cosmic Scene will entice and motivate even the most reluctant students to dig into astronomy, physics and mathematics content with enthusiasm. The accompanying teacher modules for each episode of Spaced Out: A Cosmic Scene illustrate how key concepts may be taught, connections to the standards, and assessment strategies; expand on the materials in the student video, pointing out subtle points that might be missed or are not brought out in the student video; provide suggestions on how to incorporate the student video into daily classroom instruction; and, make connections to mathematics applications. In addition, the teacher modules are the link to curriculum resources - numerous curriculum links identify multiple web-based resources, which provide educators with further background information on the key concepts and student lessons suggestions for the classroom. As one teacher who participated in the development of the project noted, "When I was a new teacher I struggled to find good, interactive resources to share with my students. This project has a wealth of information for teachers to share with their students and it includes assessments to evaluate their learning progress." Spaced Out: A Cosmic Scene builds on the notion that we learn science by doing science!
Views: 31928 woubpbs
How Long Does It Take for Radio Waves to Reach the Moon? : Lessons in Physics & Chemistry
 
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Subscribe Now: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=ehoweducation Watch More: http://www.youtube.com/ehoweducation A radio wave is just one type of electromagnetic radiation. Find out about how long it takes for radio waves to reach the moon with help from an experienced educator in this free video clip. Expert: Walter Unglaub Filmmaker: bjorn wilde Series Description: Physics plays a very important role in the world around us everyday, even if you don't necessarily realize it. Get tips on physics and chemistry with help from an experienced educator in this free video series.
Views: 3845 eHowEducation
Waves on the surface of water HD
 
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The waves on the surface of the water are neither longitudinal nor transverse. We can see in animation that red ball, which simulates the molecule of the water surface, moves in a circle path. So, the wave on the water surface is the superposition of transverse and longitudinal motions of the molecules. The molecules on the water surface move under the action of surface tension and gravity. Next animation simulates the wave motion of the molecules in the surface layer of water (or other liquid). If the amplitude of this wave is small, then every molecule moves in a circle path. The radii of these circles are diminishing with depth, so the balls in bottom part of animation are still.
Views: 198060 Alexander C
Characteristics of Sound Waves
 
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We have understood how sound travels from one place to another. But can sound travel without air? Can sound be heard inside water? What are the Characteristics of Sound Waves? More about Sound Waves & it's Characteristics https://byjus.com/physics/characteristics-of-sound-waves/ We at Byju's Classes strongly believe that a spirit of learning and understanding can only be inculcated when the student is curious, and that curiosity can be brought about by creative and effective teaching. It is this approach that makes our lectures so successful and gives our students an edge over their counterparts. Our website- http://www.byjus.com/ Download our app on android- https://goo.gl/5Uz70E Download our app on an Apple device- https://goo.gl/2mLi1I
Views: 320026 BYJU'S
Introduction to waves | Mechanical waves and sound | Physics | Khan Academy
 
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Introduction to transverse and longitudinal waves. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/physics/mechanical-waves-and-sound/mechanical-waves/v/amplitude-period-frequency-and-wavelength-of-periodic-waves?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=physics Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/physics/magnetic-forces-and-magnetic-fields/magnetic-flux-faradays-law/v/faradays-law-for-generating-electricity?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=physics Physics on Khan Academy: Physics is the study of the basic principles that govern the physical world around us. We'll start by looking at motion itself. Then, we'll learn about forces, momentum, energy, and other concepts in lots of different physical situations. To get the most out of physics, you'll need a solid understanding of algebra and a basic understanding of trigonometry. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Physics channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0oGarQW2lE5PxhGoQAKV7Q?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 978970 Khan Academy
Are Sound Waves Longitudinal waves? - CBSE 9
 
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Are sound waves longitudnal waves? Are they pressure waves? What do we mean by longitudnal or pressure waves? Watch this video to know more. To access the entire course, do visit our website here: https://DontMemorise.com Don’t Memorise brings learning to life through its captivating FREE educational videos. To Know More, visit https://DontMemorise.com New videos every week. To stay updated, subscribe to our YouTube channel : http://bit.ly/DontMemoriseYouTube Register on our website to gain access to all videos and quizzes: http://bit.ly/DontMemoriseRegister Subscribe to our Newsletter: http://bit.ly/DontMemoriseNewsLetter Join us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/DontMemoriseFacebook Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/dontmemorise Follow us : http://bit.ly/DontMemoriseBlog
Views: 19422 Don't Memorise
Longitudinal & Transverse Waves
 
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www.deltastep.com
Views: 184732 DeltaStep
Electromagnetic waves and the electromagnetic spectrum | Physics | Khan Academy
 
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Created by David SantoPietro. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/physics/light-waves/introduction-to-light-waves/v/polarization-of-light-linear-and-circular?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=physics Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/physics/mechanical-waves-and-sound/doppler-effect/v/doppler-effect-reflection-off-a-moving-object?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=physics Physics on Khan Academy: Physics is the study of the basic principles that govern the physical world around us. We'll start by looking at motion itself. Then, we'll learn about forces, momentum, energy, and other concepts in lots of different physical situations. To get the most out of physics, you'll need a solid understanding of algebra and a basic understanding of trigonometry. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Physics channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0oGarQW2lE5PxhGoQAKV7Q?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 563423 khanacademymedicine
ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES PART 01
 
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For more information: http://www.7activestudio.com [email protected] http://www.7activemedical.com/ [email protected] http://www.sciencetuts.com/ [email protected] Contact: +91- 9700061777, +91- 9100061777 7 Active Technology Solutions Pvt.Ltd. is an educational 3D digital content provider for K-12. We also customise the content as per your requirement for companies platform providers colleges etc . 7 Active driving force "The Joy of Happy Learning" -- is what makes difference from other digital content providers. We consider Student needs, Lecturer needs and College needs in designing the 3D & 2D Animated Video Lectures. We are carrying a huge 3D Digital Library ready to use. Electro magnetic waves: ELECTROMAGNETIC WAVES:- It was observed that a time varying magnetic field acts as a source of electric field and a changing electric filed give raise to magnetic field they any one of above fields changing with time a field of other kind id introduced. Consider a charge oscillating with same frequency this produces an oscillating electric filed in space .which produces an oscillating magnetic filed .this oscillating electric and magnetic field regenerate each other the wave propagates through the space .the frequency of electromagnetic wave is equal to frequency of oscillation of the charge.The detailed study shows that plane progressing electromagnetic wave so produced the following characteristics. The electric vector E ⃗ the magnetic vector B ⃗ are mutually perpendicular to each other are travelling in space to generate electromagnetic progressive wave and the direction of propagation of the wave is perpendicular to both electric vector and magnetic vector If the wave propagates in X-direction the electric field in y- direction the magnetic field is in the z-directions.
Views: 184079 7activestudio
Physics - Sound Waves
 
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Sound waves are caused by vibrating objects. The waves can pass quickly through solids, a bit more slowly through liquids, and more slowly again through gases. They can't travel through a vacuum. If a sound wave hits your ear and makes it vibrate, you hear the sound. Sound waves can be reflected by hard, flat surfaces, and absorbed by soft ones. Reflected sound waves are echoes. They can also refract. The loudness of a sound depends on the amplitude of the wave, and the pitch depends on the frequency. High frequency sound waves sound high pitched and vice versa. Human beings can only hear sound waves between about 20 hertz and 20 kilohertz.
Is light a particle or a wave? - Colm Kelleher
 
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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/is-light-a-particle-or-a-wave-colm-kelleher Can we accurately describe light as exclusively a wave or just a particle? Are the two mutually exclusive? In this third part of his series on light and color, Colm Kelleher discusses wave-particle duality and its relationship to how we see light and, therefore, color. Lesson by Colm Kelleher, animation by Nelson Diaz.
Views: 716919 TED-Ed
How electromagnetic waves propagate | animation
 
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___Here we discuss that how Electromagnetic wave propagate. ____ Definition and Animation _________________________ Made by Shuvadip Ganguli ____________________________________________________________________ My website link (Many Physics related pdfs ,videos,audios available here) "PHYSICSworld-A Database of Physics" https://gangulishuva.wixsite.com/physicsw0rld Official face book page link https://www.facebook.com/PHYSICSworldsg Official Google site address https://sites.google.com/view/physicsworld-shuvadip-ganguli/home Official twitter account link https://twitter.com/PHYSICSworldsg Official Blogger http://physicsworld2017.blogspot.com _______________________________ Please LIKE, SHARE and SUBSCRIBE this channel for more updates #PHYSICSworldADatabaseofPhysics
Views: 3796 PHYSICSworld Database
8. Electromagnetic Waves in a Vacuum
 
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View the complete OCW resource: http://ocw.mit.edu/resources/res-8-005-vibrations-and-waves-problem-solving-fall-2012/ Instructor: Wit Busza In this session, we show how the properties (wavelength, frequency, amplitude and polarization) of an electromagnetic wave can be concluded from the equation that describes the wave and vice versa. *NOTE: These videos were originally produced as part of a physics course that is no longer available on OCW.* License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 32211 MIT OpenCourseWare
PHYS 101/102 #1: Electromagnetic Waves
 
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Sparks fly—literally—as CU physicist Bob Richardson lectures on the propagation of electromagnetic radiation (1981)
Views: 486034 Cornell University
Waves transfer energy
 
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GCSE 1-9, waves topic. Waves transfer energy but not matter, describing evidence to show this using water and sound waves.
What Is Earthquake | Seismic Waves | P and S Waves
 
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The study of seismic waves provides a complete picture of the layered interior. Why does the earth shake? What are P and S waves? What are surface waves and body waves? What are propagation of earthquake waves? schools online, online classes for middle schoolers, online education programs for high school, teaching online high school, online courses for middle school Tool i use to make videos:- http://amzn.to/2jxqiHI Video of Dr. Keith Miller demonstrating P & S waves https://goo.gl/SQypKg Fill this feedback form for a better learning experience https://goo.gl/vrYPBw Click here if you want to subscribe https://www.youtube.com/user/TheRealSengupta
Views: 295625 Amit Sengupta
Waves Introduction - www.topIITcoaching.com
 
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Wave Motion is the method of energy transfer from one point to another without bulk transfer of matter. What this means is that in wave motion energy is transferred from one point to another but matter does not move from one point to another. One example of wave motion is the motion of sound waves when we speak. The sound energy is transferred from our mouth to the ear of the listener but the air particles which transmit the sound do not move from our mouth to the ear. Only the energy moves as the air particles vibrate. Another example of wave motion is the creation of a ripples in a pond when a stone is dropped in it. Water does not travel from the center of the ripple-circles to the periphery radially. Only the energy imparted by the pebble to the water travels radially outwards. So if we place a leaf in the water, it will not move radially outwards with the ripples. It will simply bob up and down because the water particles only vibrate, they don't move radially. There are 2 types of waves: (i) Non-mechanical Waves These waves are also known as electro-magnetic waves. These do not need material medium to travel through. This means that energy can be transferred from one point to another without there being any particles in between. Sound waves are not electromagnetic waves because they require air/water/steel etc particles to travel. Electromagnetic waves can travel through space. Light waves, radio waves and infra-red waves are examples of electro-magnetic waves. We can feel the heat from the sun because heat waves are electromagnetic and can travel through space. (ii) Mechanical Waves These are waves that exist in a material medium having inertia and elasticity. Energy is transferred in this case, by the vibration of medium particles. For instance, when we speak, the air particles near our mouth vibrate. These air particles cause some other nearby air particles to vibrate -- and soon a disturbance is setup which gets transmitted by the vibration of air particles. In case of all mechanical waves the energy disturbance propagates through periodic motion of medium particles about a mean position. A wave motion which progresses onwards through the medium, with energy transferred across every section of it, is called a traveling or progressive wave. Mechanical waves are of 2 different types: (a) Transverse Waves In case of transverse mechanical waves the medium particles vibrate perpendicular to the direction of transfer of energy. So if energy is being transferred from left to right, the particles move up and down. (b) Longitudinal Waves Are waves in which particles vibrate in a direction parallel to the direction of energy transfer. The energy is transferred through compressions and rarefactions that are created when the particles oscillate about their mean positions. This picture better denotes how longitudinal waves are transmitted. To read complete description and view complete video, log on to http://www.topIITcoaching.com
Views: 18679 topiitcoaching
Sound Waves in Action | Waves | Physics for All | FuseSchool
 
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Did you know that birdsong is a disturbance? In this video we will look at how sound waves travel and see them in action: how a Ruben’s tube shows sound waves and how the human ear works. Sound is a longitudinal wave, pulsing like a slinky. Sound waves are technically a disturbance, because they travel by disturbing the next particles along. What do sound waves need to travel? Medium Source Transportation Sound needs a medium to travel through, because it needs particles to disturb. Which is why the vacuum of space is silent - there are no particles for sound waves to disturb. Usually, this medium is air. Though it could be any material, such as water or steel or the ground. The medium is any series of interconnected and interacting particles - so it can be solid, liquid or gas. So we have a medium. Sound then needs an original source of the wave. The source is any vibrating object that can disturb the first particle of the medium. The disturbance could be vibrating vocal cords, the vibrating diaphragm of a speaker or the vibrating metal of a machine. We have our source and our medium to travel through. The sound wave is transported from one location to another by particle-to-particle interaction. As one particle is displaced, it exerts a push or pull on its nearest neighbours, causing them to be displaced from their position. The Ruben’s tube is a spectacular physics experiment involving fire to demonstrate that sound is a longitudinal wave. The Ruben’s tube is a hollow tube that is filled with a flammable gas, usually propane. Holes are drilled at regular intervals along the top of the tube. One end of the tube has a rubber membrane stretched across it and a loudspeaker positioned next to it. The gas leaks through the holes at the top of the tube. The gas is lit, creating lots of small flames along the top of the tube. When the speaker is switched on sound waves travel down the tube. The gas inside the tube follows the sound pressure wave and leaks out of the holes, in a wave pattern. Therefore the flames also appear wave-like, depending on which holes are leaking the most gas. How awesome is that?! So we’ve just shown how we can see sound. Wow! But how do we hear sound? We know that sound waves are actually vibrations passing through a medium. Our ear works by funnelling these vibrations along through different parts of the ear from canals, to membranes, to small bones, until the vibrations reach the fluid of the cochlea, in the inner ear. The cochlea transforms the vibrating sound waves into electrical impulses, which are sent on to the brain. So while most people wouldn’t agree, now you know birdsong is a disturbance…of particles! And we can use fire to see sound waves!! CREDITS Animation & Design: Chloe Fyvie Adams Narration: Dale Bennet Script: Bethan Parry SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
How Radio Waves Are Produced
 
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UNLOCKING THE MYSTERIES BEHIND RADIO WAVES. Electric current creates magnetic field, oscillating electric current creates oscillating magnetic field and not "electromagnetic wave" as current belief. Electron has a standing- electric field and magnetic field at right angle (watch video structure of electron). The flow of electrons in a conductor is essentially caused by the attraction between the electric fields of mobile electrons and "fixed" positive charges in the conductor. Oscillation of electrons in a conductor is caused by the alternation of electric polarity in the conductor. Because of electric field and magnetic field of an electron is at right angle, when oscillates the electric field of the electron will be parallel to the oscillation and magnetic field will be perpendicular to the oscillation.This oscillation of the electron creates transverse wave on its magnetic line and the oscillating magnetic line is radiated to space. http://www.amazon.com/author/atom http://www.facebook.com/novaphysica https://www.youtube.com/user/atommodel
Views: 782821 AtomModel
The Coolest Things Sound Waves Do
 
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Sound waves are all around us, and when harnessed, can do some super cool things. Trace looks at a few ways we're using the power of sound waves to our advantage. Read More: Sound Waves Levitate, Move Particles http://news.discovery.com/tech/nanotechnology/sound-waves-levitate-move-particles-130716.htm#mkcpgn=ytnws1 "People have been able to levitate small objects using sound for years. But applications for the technique are severely limited because scientists hadn't figured out how to control and manipulate the floating objects. Until now." Sensitivity of Human Ear http://hyperphysics.phy-astr.gsu.edu/hbase/sound/earsens.html "It is capable of detecting pressure variations of less than one billionth of atmospheric pressure." How Submarines Work http://science.howstuffworks.com/transport/engines-equipment/submarine.htm "Submarines are incredible pieces of technology. Not so long ago, a naval force worked entirely above the water; with the addition of the s­ubmarine to the standard naval arsenal, the world below the surface became a battleground as well." Top 10 Amazing Uses for Sound http://listverse.com/2012/11/14/top-10-amazing-uses-for-sound/ "Wherever we go, we're surrounded by sounds. Although we usually we take them for granted, they can sometimes be used in ways we didn't expect." How Bats Work http://science.howstuffworks.com/zoology/mammals/bat2.htm "In the last section, we saw that the unique wing structure of bats gives them a great deal of flight maneuverability." How Ultrasound Works http://science.howstuffworks.com/ultrasound.htm "There are ma­ny reasons to g­et an ultrasound. Perhaps you're pregnant, and your obstetrician wants you to have an ultrasound to check on the developing baby or determine the due date." Could A Sonic Weapon Make Your Head Explode? http://www.popsci.com/technology/article/2012-11/acoustic-weapons-book-excerpt "There's an elevator in the Brown University Biomed building (hopefully fixed by now) that I've heard called "the elevator to hell," not because of destination but because there is a bent blade in the overhead fan." How LRAD Works http://science.howstuffworks.com/lrad.htm/printable "In November 2005, pirates attacked the cruise ship Seabourn Spirit off the coast of Somalia." Watch More: Silence Drives You Crazy: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dtZNjzeShYw Plants Can Hear You: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ApZ59MSty4o All About Aurora Borealis: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TcxOZz8l8kg ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos twice daily. Watch More DNews on TestTube http://testtube.com/dnews Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel DNews on Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Anthony Carboni on Twitter http://twitter.com/acarboni Laci Green on Twitter http://twitter.com/gogreen18 Trace Dominguez on Twitter http://twitter.com/trace501 DNews on Facebook http://facebook.com/dnews DNews on Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews Discovery News http://discoverynews.com
Views: 1548163 Seeker
GCSE Science Physics (9-1) Transverse and Longitudinal Waves
 
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Find my revision workbooks here: https://www.freesciencelessons.co.uk/workbooks/shop/ In this video, we start looking at waves. We explore the key differences between transverse and longitudinal waves. We then look at how when a wave travels, the wave moves but not the medium. Deliberate Thought by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/?keywords=deliberate+thought Artist: http://incompetech.com/
Views: 195902 Freesciencelessons
Tachyons: Faster Than Light Particles
 
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Bonus Videos, "The Nature of Itself," & "Chemicals of Reality," Premium Videos Available @ http://www.patreon.com/strangemysteries Narrated by Jack Daniel www.jackdanielvo.com It is often said that nothing can travel faster than the speed of light. The universal speed limit is 299,792,458 metres or 300,000 kilometres per second, and due to the rules the flying spaghetti monster imposed upon the universe during its creation, this limit cannot be broken. Or can it? Theoretical physics describes a type of particle which may be able to break the light barrier. It can also reportedly travel through time, it gets faster as it loses energy and it possesses has negative mass. So does this mysterious particle really exist? The "Nature of Itself Trailer" Background Music: Seven Lions, Tritonal, Kill the Noise - Horizon (feat. HALIENE) Released by Enhanced http://enhancedmusic.com/home/ https://soundcloud.com/enhanced https://www.facebook.com/EnhancedMusic Get Horizon Now: https://enhanced.lnk.to/Enhanced349Yo REFERENCES: Ehrlich, Robert. 2015. “Six Observations Consistent with the Electron Neutrino Being a m2=-0.11±0.02eV2 Tachyon.” Astroparticle Physics 66 (June): 11–17. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.astropartphys.2014.12.011. Fried, H. M., and Y. Gabellini. 2016. “The Birth and Death of a Universe.” The European Physical Journal C 76 (12): 709. https://doi.org/10.1140/epjc/s10052-016-4577-8. Grøn, Øyvind, and Sigbjorn Hervik. 2007. Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity: With Modern Applications in Cosmology. Springer Science & Business Media. https://market.android.com/details?id=book-IyJhCHAryuUC. Makukov, Maxim A., Eduard G. Mychelkin, and Vladimir L. Saveliev. 2016. “On Possible Tachyonic State of Neutrino Dark Matter.” International Journal of Modern Physics: Conference Series 41 (January): 1660133. https://doi.org/10.1142/S2010194516601332. Mychelkin, Eduard G., and Maxim A. Makukov. 2017. “Tachyonic Approach to Neutrino Dark Matter.” In The Fourteenth Marcel Grossmann Meeting, 2591–96. WORLD SCIENTIFIC. https://doi.org/10.1142/9789813226609_0311. Recami, E. 2009. “The Tolman-Regge Antitelephone Paradox: Its Solution by Tachyon Mechanics.” Electronic Journal of Theoretical Physics. https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Erasmo_Recami/publication/2077024_The_Tolman-Regge_Antitelephone_Paradox_Its_Solution_by_Tachyon_Mechanics/links/0c1c93028f041d2ec2e910d8/The-Tolman-Regge-Antitelephone-Paradox-Its-Solution-by-Tachyon-Mechanics.pdf. Spencer, Joseph Andrew, and James T. Wheeler. 2008. “The Existence of Time.” arXiv [gr-Qc]. arXiv. http://arxiv.org/abs/0811.0112. Hello Sprint Executives, thanks for reading this.
Views: 795664 Strange Mysteries
How Sound Waves Travel
 
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M2 students show how a sound wave travels by using a slinky. Video has been filmed in slow motion.
Views: 150 Philip Trott
Bill Nye the Science Guy S03E11 Waves
 
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Bill Nye the Science Guy playlist: https://goo.gl/qi4YCM Check out all episode of Bill Nye the Science Guy in my chanel. For more Bill Nye the Science Guy, follow us by subscribe. Thank you.
Views: 82294 Bill Nye Fan
Speed of Sound | Mechanical waves and sound | Physics | Khan Academy
 
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How fast does sound actually travel? Created by David SantoPietro. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/physics/mechanical-waves-and-sound/sound-topic/v/relative-speed-of-sound-in-solids-liquids-and-gases?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=physics Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/physics/mechanical-waves-and-sound/sound-topic/v/sound-properties-amplitude-period-frequency-wavelength?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=physics Physics on Khan Academy: Physics is the study of the basic principles that govern the physical world around us. We'll start by looking at motion itself. Then, we'll learn about forces, momentum, energy, and other concepts in lots of different physical situations. To get the most out of physics, you'll need a solid understanding of algebra and a basic understanding of trigonometry. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Physics channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0oGarQW2lE5PxhGoQAKV7Q?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 251263 khanacademymedicine
Making waves: The power of concentration gradients - Sasha Wright
 
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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/the-motion-of-the-ocean-the-concentration-gradient-sasha-wright The constant motion of our oceans represents a vast and complicated system involving many different drivers. Sasha Wright explains the physics behind one of those drivers -- the concentration gradient -- and illustrates how our oceans are continually engaging in a universal struggle for space. Lesson by Sasha Wright, animation by Andrew Foerster.
Views: 161017 TED-Ed
Sound Waves (Telugu Medium)
 
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MANA TV DIGITAL LESSON
Views: 40464 GNANESHWAR
What are Electromagnetic waves?
 
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Ever wondered how electromagnetics look like or how they can move through space? How the elemagnetic spectrum changes and what some uses of EM waves are? Get answers to all of these questions in this video! Electromagnetic waves are a huge part of our lives. We are constantly swimming in a sea of EM waves! They are emitted from all the devices we own, whether in the form of visible light or radio waves, they are everywhere! The Electromagnetic spectrum shows how the waves change but are similar at the same time. What defines an EM wave. EM waves are drawn out in all sorts of dimensions in books and notes but what do they really look like? How do they propogate - this is what the video answers! The density of a medium can determine the speed of an EM wave slightly so changes the way it behaves. This can be demonstration with an object in a glass of water. Reflection and refraction are useful properties as they are used by optical fibres to transmit data from one place to another - a huge part of telecommunications! EM wave are a radiation - which is not necessarily a bad thing! In this video find out why! ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Hi! My name is Hana! Thank you for watching this video! I hope you've learnt something from it. If you have any questions, post them below and I'll be happy to answer you. Subscribe for more videos like this every fortnight! I'll see you in another video! BYE! Follow on Twitter: twitter.com/hanazenerdiode Follow on Tumblr: adventuresofanengineer.tumblr.com
Views: 48544 Hana Shoib
Can You Capture a Light Wave? Mind-Blowing Wave-Particle Duality Experiment!
 
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In this video I show you an easy way to show that light is neither a wave nor a particle (or it is both?) by doing the double slit experiment followed by an analog of the photoelectric effect. This is a crazy experiment that shows how weird quantum mechanics really is. And an added bonus is that you can do these experiments at home! Finally I even show you what an electron orbital really means. WARNING: This video is for entertainment purposes only. If you use the information from this video for your own projects then you assume complete responsibility for the results. My Other Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCA19mAJURyYHbJzhfpqhpCA My Facebook Page: https://goo.gl/dSXx8u For more awesome videos checkout: Stacking Pringles in a Complete Circle—The Amazing Physics of Stacking https://youtu.be/apJtZX39i80 Mixing the World's Blackest Paint With the World's Brightest Paint (Black 2.0 vs LIT) https://youtu.be/x5L4_GXePuk Is it Possible to Unboil an Egg? The Amazing Uncooking Experiment! https://youtu.be/QNV4gHWZ9p4 What if You Try To Lift a Negative Mass? Mind-Blowing Physical Impossibility! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uAJlg8MDAlU What Does a Giant Monster Neodymium Magnet do to a Mouse? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V8-JfSXPDp0 The Worlds Blackest Black vs The Worlds Brightest Flashlight (32,000 lumen)—Which Will Win? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AaFdCvnV8PM How Much Weight Can a Fly Actually Lift? Experiment—I Lassoed a Fly! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-xZoOUd172Q If You Fly a Drone in a Car, Does it Move With It? (Dangerous In-Car Flight Challenge) https://youtu.be/XjTj-tGPSWE Can Flies Actually Fly in a Vacuum Chamber? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C4h-AS729JM I Let a Venus Flytrap Digest My Finger For a Day–Little Shop of Horrors Challenge! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tPLuWcOGBCE Drawing On Water-It is So Surreal! https://youtu.be/3NZ-cAf8Bbw Can Magic Sand Get Wet in a Vacuum Chamber? So Satisfying! https://youtu.be/9yaMexyXucA Stretch Armstrong Crushed In A Hydraulic Press https://youtu.be/pmbWhYco4x8
Views: 398659 The Action Lab

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