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Oracle SQL Tutorial 21 - How to Create / Drop Indexes
 
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In the last video, we wrote up the SQL to create three tables: CREATE TABLE users( user_id NUMBER, username VARCHAR2(50 CHAR) UNIQUE, CONSTRAINT users_pk PRIMARY KEY (user_id) ); CREATE TABLE projects( project_id NUMBER, Project_name VARCHAR2(50 CHAR) UNIQUE, creator VARCHAR2(50 CHAR) NOT NULL, CONSTRAINT projects_pk PRIMARY KEY (project_id), CONSTRAINT projects_users_fk FOREIGN KEY (creator) REFERENCES users (username) ON DELETE CASCADE ); CREATE TABLE project_users( project_id NUMBER NOT NULL REFERENCES projects (project_id) ON DELETE CASCADE, user_id NUMBER NOT NULL REFERENCES users (user_id) ON DELETE CASCADE, CONSTRAINT project_users_pk PRIMARY KEY (project_id, user_id) ); I'm going to increase the size of the users table a bit by adding a first and last name column. CREATE TABLE users( user_id NUMBER, username VARCHAR2(50 CHAR) UNIQUE, first_name VARCHAR2(50 CHAR), last_name VARCHAR2 (50 CHAR), CONSTRAINT users_pk PRIMARY KEY (user_id) ); But before we finish this design, we should consider indexing certain columns. What columns should we index? Well, as a reminder, the columns that are indexed by default are columns with the UNIQUE constraint, and those that are labeled as primary keys. Columns that are not indexed but often should be are those labeled as a foreign key. The column that jumps out the most to me is the creator column of the project table. It's the only foreign key that is not part of some index. Let's fix this by creating our first index. The way we do that is with the CREATE INDEX command. CREATE INDEX projects_creator_ix ON projects (creator) What naming convention are we following for the index? We are naming it by the table name, followed by an underscore, followed by the column, followed by an underscore, followed by an ix (for index). In this situation it does not apply, but if our foreign key column is labeled as UNIQUE, we can add the UNIQUE keyword like this: CREATE UNIQUE INDEX projects_creator_ix ON projects (creator) Now if you want to get rid of an INDEX, you can use this command: DROP INDEX projects_creator_ix Now, if we want to select data from the user table and the project table we can do that much faster. That's because the foreign key and column it references are both indexed and those are the columns we would do the join on. We will discuss how to do joins in a future video. So what are some potential problems with this database design? Overall, it is pretty good. With this design though we need to make sure there is no way for someone to update a user's username. In the next video we are going to discuss why. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Support me on Patreon! http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry Subscribe to my newsletter: http://eepurl.com/-8qtH Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - https://www.dreamhost.com/r.cgi?1487063 (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 6347 Caleb Curry
Oracle - SQL - Create Table
 
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Oracle - SQL - Create Table Watch more Videos at https://www.tutorialspoint.com/videotutorials/index.htm Lecture By: Mr. Anadi Sharma, Tutorials Point India Private Limited.
Types of Indexes (A B-tree index,A bitmap index )
 
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Hi guys today is very most important topic in oracle is INDEXES help to increase performance at the time of search and modification into table records.
Views: 25254 Oracle World
Oracle SQL Tutorial 11 - CREATE TABLE
 
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The way you create a table is to use the CREATE TABLE command. CREATE TABLE users() So in this situation, the name comes right after the TABLE keyword. The next thing we do is put all of the columns on a line that we want to put in our table. CREATE TABLE users( user_id, username, first_name, last_name ) Notice the naming conventions here. For this series we are going to make columns with what is known as snake casing. This is where each individual word is separated by an underscore. if you have more than one column, all of them have to have commas except the last one. The comma is a way to say that another column is coming, so you don't need to do it on the last one. Now you would think we were done, but we also have to say what data type each column is. Later we will extensively discuss data types so we can focus on them exclusively. For now, here are the data types we are going to use: CREATE TABLE users( user_id NUMBER, username VARCHAR2(50), first_name VARCHAR2(50), last_name VARCHAR2(50) ) Now, inside of the parenthesis for varchar2, we pass in a number... This is the max length of the string. But the question is, what is it measured in? The default is actually in bytes, not characters. For example if we have the string hello, it is 5 characters, but it might take up a total of 10 bytes of storage. So I would recommend adding the keyword char right after the number so it defaults to 50 characters, not bytes. CREATE TABLE users( user_id NUMBER, username VARCHAR(50 CHAR), first_name VARCHAR2(50 CHAR), last_name VARCHAR2(50 CHAR) ) This will work to create a table, but it's really missing a lot of information… which column is the primary key? Are we adding any indexes? Is there any thing else we need to say about these columns? So as you can tell, we are making progress, but there is still so much to learn. The biggest gotcha to remember from this video is that the data type VARCHAR ends in a 2, stupid, right? who would end the name of something with a 2? Once again, this is Caleb from CalebTheVideoMaker2, and we will catch you in the next one! ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ HELP ME! http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry Subscribe to my newsletter: http://eepurl.com/-8qtH Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - https://www.dreamhost.com/r.cgi?1487063 (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 22131 Caleb Curry
Oracle Optimization - Table Partitions
 
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Oracle optimization: create table partitions and Index-Organized Table. Other lessons, visit http://www.learn-with-video-tutorials.com/plsql-oracle-optimization
Index Organized Tables and Examples
 
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Index Organized Tables and Examples watch more videos at https://www.tutorialspoint.com/videotutorials/index.htm Lecture By: Mr. Parth Panjab, Tutorials Point India Private Limited
CREATE TABLE WITH CONSTRAINTS - ORACLE - SQL
 
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Create table , add constraints : primary key constraint, foreign key constraint, check constraint, unique constraint, specifying the table space for index, modifying table, dropping table Oracle 10g
Views: 9601 R.N.A. Creation
how to declare the index by table in PLSQL (Oracle)?
 
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in this video, you will learn how to declare the index by table and how to use the exist function ?
Views: 4277 MahmoudRFarra
SQL: Indexes - Bit Map & B-trees
 
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In this tutorial, you'll learn when to use b-tree and bitmap index
Views: 50308 radhikaravikumar
50 Oracle 11g Tutorials    Primary & Foreign Key Indexing
 
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Introduction to Oracle 11g Tuts
Views: 2302 saratutus
Oracle SQL Tutorial 14 - Column-Level and Table-Level Constraints
 
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In the previous video we talked about adding constraints at the column-level. We made it nice and simple by only requiring a few keywords, but the problem we were having is that we could not assign a name to the constraint, which many people like to do so we can reference easily if we need to at a later time. To do this, it requires a little bit more typing, but it will give us extra flexibility and many consider it to be the higher quality approach to adding constraints. Let's go though a simple example. Let's say we have a users table with a user_id column that we want to make a primary key. We will create the table like this: CREATE TABLE( user_ id NUMBER PRIMARY KEY ) Instead of adding the PRIMARY KEY keywords after the data type, we add: CONSTRAINT user_pk PRIMARY KEY Now, we have assigned the name user_pk to this constraint. You can do the same with other constraints, such as UNIQUE. The syntax would be CONSTRAINT username_un UNIQUE. The other way to create constraints requires to put all of our constraints at the bottom of our table creation rather than inline with the column. This type of constraint is known as a table-level constraints. To make a column a primary key using table-level constraints, we add it to the CREATE TABLE command as if it is another row and use the CONSTRAINT keyword to tell Oracle that what is coming is a constraint, not a column in our table. CREATE TABLE users( user_id NUMBER, username VARCHAR2(50 CHAR), CONSTRAINT username_un UNIQUE (username), CONSTRAINT users_pk PRIMARY KEY (user_id) ) The primary differences here is that you have to put the column you are talking about in parenthesis after the PRIMARY KEY keyword. That's because it's at the end of the table and you need a way to tell it what column you are talking about. The option of putting it at the end of the table has the added benefit in this situation because if we needed to have a primary key that is the combination of multiple columns, we can do that by just adding the other column in the PRIMARY KEY parenthesis right after a comma. In summary, there are three ways to make constraints. The first is at the column level, unnamed. The second is at the column level, named. The third is at the table level, also named. In the next video we are going to create a named constraint in Oracle SQL Developer, so stay tuned and be sure to subscribe! ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Support me! http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry Subscribe to my newsletter: http://eepurl.com/-8qtH Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - https://www.dreamhost.com/r.cgi?1487063 (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 10634 Caleb Curry
SQL Server 34 - How to Create and Drop Indexes
 
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Creating indexes is a very easy task, but before you go creating indexes on everything, you need to know that some columns are indexed by default. Specifically, any column that is labeled as the PRIMARY KEY or UNIQUE are indexed by default. That means that if you have a UNIQUE column, you do not need to worry about adding an INDEX to it. The columns that you will want to pay special attention to are any foreign keys or columns that you are going to use very frequently. We are going to create an index on our SpeciesID column in our Animals table. This is a foreign key that I'm likely going to use very frequently. CREATE INDEX IX_AnimalsSpecies ON Animals (SpeciesID); The syntax is very similar to CREATE TABLE in that you say CREATE INDEX followed by an index name. The IX_ is a prefix that is sometimes conventionally used to name indexes. Next, we have the table name, and then we have something to describe the column. That way if you see IX_AnimalsSpecies, you automatically know it is talking about an Index for the Animals table that is on the column dealing with the species. To get rid of this index, use this: DROP INDEX IX_AnimalsSpecies; Which is also very similar to how we drop a table. Now, you can also create an INDEX on multiple columns if you are going to use them together very often. The way you do that is just add another column after a comma inside of the () in the index columns. For example: CREATE INDEX IX_AnmialsContact ON Animals (Name, ContactEmail); One other thing I wanted to show you is that you can actually create a UNIQUE Index by adding the keyword in: CREATE UNIQUE INDEX IX_Species ON Species (Species); This should only be used if every value for a column is labeled unique…In fact, it forces every row to be unique. Remember though that if a column is labeled UNIQUE, it is indexed by default...So this is not needed in this situation. In the next video we will discuss in more detail whether you want to use the UNIQUE Constraint create a UNIQUE index. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Support me! http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry Subscribe to my newsletter: http://eepurl.com/-8qtH Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - https://www.dreamhost.com/r.cgi?1487063 (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 5841 Caleb Curry
01 Overview of table Partition in oracle
 
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Partitioning enhances the performance, manageability, and availability of a wide variety of applications and helps reduce the total cost of ownership for storing large amounts of data. Partitioning allows tables, indexes, and index-organized tables to be subdivided into smaller pieces, enabling these database objects to be managed and accessed at a finer level of granularity. Oracle provides a rich variety of partitioning strategies and extensions to address every business requirement. Moreover, since it is entirely transparent, partitioning can be applied to almost any application without the need for potentially expensive and time consuming application changes. Partitioning allows a table, index, or index-organized table to be subdivided into smaller pieces, where each piece of such a database object is called a partition. Each partition has its own name, and may optionally have its own storage characteristics. From the perspective of a database administrator, a partitioned object has multiple pieces that can be managed either collectively or individually. This gives the administrator considerable flexibility in managing partitioned objects. However, from the perspective of the application, a partitioned table is identical to a non-partitioned table; no modifications are necessary when accessing a partitioned table using SQL queries and DML statements. Partitioning Key ======================== Each row in a partitioned table is unambiguously assigned to a single partition. The partitioning key is comprised of one or more columns that determine the partition where each row will be stored. Oracle automatically directs insert, update, and delete operations to the appropriate partition through the use of the partitioning key. When to Partition a Table ========================== Here are some suggestions for when to partition a table: Tables greater than 2 GB should always be considered as candidates for partitioning. Tables containing historical data, in which new data is added into the newest partition. A typical example is a historical table where only the current month's data is updatable and the other 11 months are read only. When the contents of a table need to be distributed across different types of storage devices. When to Partition an Index ============================= Here are some suggestions for when to consider partitioning an index: Avoid rebuilding the entire index when data is removed. Perform maintenance on parts of the data without invalidating the entire index. Reduce the impact of index skew caused by an index on a column with a monotonically increasing value. Partitioned Index-Organized Tables =================================== Partitioned index-organized tables are very useful for providing improved performance, manageability, and availability for index-organized tables. For partitioning an index-organized table: ============================================ Partition columns must be a subset of the primary key columns Secondary indexes can be partitioned (both locally and globally) OVERFLOW data segments are always equi-partitioned with the table partitions See Also: Oracle Database Concepts for more information about index-organized tables System Partitioning System partitioning enables application-controlled partitioning without having the database controlling the data placement. The database simply provides the ability to break down a table into partitions without knowing what the individual partitions are going to be used for. All aspects of partitioning have to be controlled by the application. For example, an insertion into a system partitioned table without the explicit specification of a partition will fail. System partitioning provides the well-known benefits of partitioning (scalability, availability, and manageability), but the partitioning and actual data placement are controlled by the application. See Also: Oracle Database Data Cartridge Developer's Guide for more information about system partitioning Partitioning for Information Lifecycle Management Information Lifecycle Management (ILM) is concerned with managing data during its lifetime. Partitioning plays a key role in ILM because it enables groups of data (that is, partitions) to be distributed across different types of storage devices and managed individually.
Views: 6113 OnLinE ReSoUrCe
Creating an Index in Oracle SQL
 
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This video shows how to Create an index in Oracle SQL . Try to share these videos for poor students and subscribe this channel for more upcoming other technical videos.
Views: 27 Technology mart
Oracle ||  Index Organized Tables by siva
 
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DURGASOFT is INDIA's No.1 Software Training Center offers online training on various technologies like JAVA, .NET , ANDROID,HADOOP,TESTING TOOLS , ADF, INFORMATICA,TABLEAU,IPHONE,OBIEE,ANJULAR JS, SAP... courses from Hyderabad & Bangalore -India with Real Time Experts. Mail us your requirements to [email protected] so that our Supporting Team will arrange Demo Sessions. Ph:Call +91-8885252627,+91-7207212428,+91-7207212427,+91-8096969696. http://durgasoft.com http://durgasoftonlinetraining.com https://www.facebook.com/durgasoftware http://durgajobs.com https://www.facebook.com/durgajobsinfo............
Oracle SQL Tutorial 20 - How to Create Composite Primary Keys
 
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This video is going to be a tutorial on how to create composite and compound keys. The difference between a composite and compound key is that a composite key can consist of any columns while a compound key has to consist of columns that are all keys themselves. We will be working with a compound key because we are going to be using the an intermediary table that has two foreign keys. The combination of both of the keys have to be unique. First, if we have any other CREATE TABLE commands, we are going to comment those out. We will space out the CREATE TABLE to have each column on a line, then we will add constraints as needed. CREATE TABLE project_users( project_id, user_id ) Now, let's add the data types: CREATE TABLE project_users( project_id NUMBER, user_id NUMBER } Now, what about some column attributes? I'm going to make both of the columns NOT NULL because we always want the rows to have a user and a project: CREATE TABLE project_users( project_id NUMBER NOT NULL, user_id NUMBER NOT NULL } Now, let's add the foreign key constraints. Now, what do we name these? We are going to add a primary key that covers both of these columns, so I'm going to be a sinner and not give these constraints names: CREATE TABLE project_users( project_id NUMBER NOT NULL REFERENCES projects (project_id), user_id NUMBER NOT NULL REFFERENCES users (user_id) ) Now, the way we have it now is that if we delete a project in the project table, and there are any rows in the project_users table, it will throw an error and prevent deletion. I would prefer for it to also delete any project members. That would make sense because if you delete a project we want it to delete the associate between that project and certain users. The same goes for if we delete a user, we want their association with a certain project to be deleted. To do this, we need to add the ON DELETE command: CREATE TABLE project_users( project_id NUMBER NOT NULL REFERENCES projects (project_id) ON DELETE CASCADE, user_id NUMBER NOT NULL REFERENCES users (user_id) ON DELETE CASCADE, ) Finally, let's learn how to create a compound or composite key. literally, the only difference is that you put a comma and add the second table inside of the parenthesis. CREATE TABLE project_users( project_id NUMBER NOT NULL REFERENCES projects (project_id) ON DELETE CASCADE, user_id NUMBER NOT NULL REFERENCES users (user_id) ON DELETE CASCADE, CONSTRAINT project_users_pk PRIMARY KEY (project_id, user_id) ) Now, the combination of project_id and user_id cannot be null, is always unique, and has an index. The only thing we should do now is add a few indexes. We aren't done yet...In the next video we are going to figure out what columns would benefit from indexes and we'll add them to it. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ HELP ME! http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry Subscribe to my newsletter: http://eepurl.com/-8qtH Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - https://www.dreamhost.com/r.cgi?1487063 (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 7861 Caleb Curry
Heap Tables and Index Organized Tables in Oracle | Chris Saxon
 
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Chris Saxon, a database evangelist, developer advocate, and SQL specialist with Oracle, uses up his two minutes with a tip on using heap tables and index organized tables in Oracle Database.
BITMAP  and  BITMAP JOIN INDEX IN ORACLE explained
 
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The video explains BITMAP and BITMAP JOIN INDEX IN ORACLE and when you should create them on a column. BITMAP INDEXES should be dealt with carefully as they can lead to serious performance issues if the table is updated by multiple processes in parallel. Indexing Basics :https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0X9bbtwTnuE&t=1095s Star and snowflake Schema :https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qq4yhhAk9fc&t=17s
Views: 1005 Tech Coach
B*Tree Index Fundamentals(Indexes in Oracle-1)
 
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Part -1 : Introduction to Indexes, B*Tree Indexes, Index scan methods. Part -2 : B*Tree Index Types(different types of B*Tree indexes) Part -3: Using B*Tree Indexes(When use B*Tree indexes, factors related to B*Tree Access) Part -4 : Index Organized Table Part -5 : Bitmap Indexes Part -6: Partitioned Indexes Part- 7: Other type of Indexes based on characteristics & use. Part -8: Managing Indexes
Views: 47853 Anindya Das
SQL tutorials 17: SQL Primary Key constraint,  Drop primary Key
 
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Blog link: http://www.rebellionrider.com/sql-primary-key.htm SQL tutorial on Primary key / SQL Primary key, In this tutorial you will learn about simple primary key, composute primary key, how to drop primary key. defining primary key using create table and alter table along with many other things. Tool used in this tutorial is SQL Developer. This tutorial series is part of SQL expert exam certification training. if you are preparing for SQL certification you can use my tutorials. This SQL Tutorial is a part of free training. Copy Cloud referral link || Use this link to join copy cloud and get 20GB of free storage https://copy.com?r=j7eYO7 Contacts E-Mail [email protected] Twitter https://twitter.com/rebellionrider Instagram http://instagram.com/rebellionrider Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/imthebhardwaj Linkedin. http://in.linkedin.com/in/mannbhardwaj/ Thanks for linking, commenting, sharing and watching more of our videos This is Manish from RebellionRider.com So Primary Key There are two types of Primary keys First is Simple primary Key: Primary key which Involves only one column and Second is Composite Primary Key: Primary Key which involves more than one column. We will start with Simple primary key. You can create Primary key either with Create Table statement of by using Alter table Statement. Let's define simple primary key using create table statements. With create table statement we can either define primary key at column level or at table level. We will start with defining Primary key at column level using create table statement. You just have to put keyword Primary key after data type and size of column while defining a column of a table. Here oracle server will create a primary key on product id with default constraint name which will be slightly difficult to understand. You can give your own name to your constraint which is also a good practice.
Views: 92410 Manish Sharma
Indexes in sql server   Part 35
 
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In this video we will learn about What are indexes Why do we use indexes Advantages of indexes These concepts are applicable to sql server 2000, 2005 and 2008 Text version of the video http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/2012/09/indexes-in-sql-server-part-35.html Slides http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/2013/08/part-35-indexes.html All SQL Server Text Articles http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/p/free-sql-server-video-tutorials-for.html All SQL Server Slides http://csharp-video-tutorials.blogspot.com/p/sql-server.html All Dot Net and SQL Server Tutorials in English https://www.youtube.com/user/kudvenkat/playlists?view=1&sort=dd All Dot Net and SQL Server Tutorials in Arabic https://www.youtube.com/c/KudvenkatArabic/playlists
Views: 331694 kudvenkat
PLS-16: PL/SQL Index By Table
 
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PL/SQL Tutorials For Full Course Experience Please Go To http://mentorsnet.org/course_preview?course_id=5 Full Course Experience Includes 1. Access to course videos and exercises 2. View & manage your progress/pace 3. In-class projects and code reviews 4. Personal guidance from your Mentors
Views: 54727 Oresoft LWC
Database Tutorial - 18 - Creating Index
 
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Please Rate, Comment and Subscribe. Available for Hire: http://www.naveedziarab.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/CreativityTuts Website: http://www.creativitytuts.org
Views: 8692 Naveed Ziarab
PL/SQL tutorial 33: Table Based Record Datatype In Oracle Database by Manish Sharma
 
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Learn how to create a table based record type variable in Oracle Database By Manish Sharma from RebellionRider.com ------------------------------------------------------------------------ ►►►LINKS◄◄◄ Blog : http://bit.ly/table-based-records Previous Tutorial ► Introduction To Records: https://youtu.be/1iHbZDuDbis ► SELECT-INTO Statement: https://youtu.be/Zt0vlmTqhP4 ------------------------------------------------------------------------- ►►►Let's Get Free Uber Cab◄◄◄ Use Referral Code UberRebellionRider and get $20 free for your first ride. ------------------------------------------------------------------------- ►Make sure you SUBSCRIBE and be the 1st one to see my videos! ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ ►►►Find me on Social Media◄◄◄ Follow What I am up to as it happens on https://twitter.com/rebellionrider https://www.facebook.com/imthebhardwaj http://instagram.com/rebellionrider https://plus.google.com/+Rebellionrider http://in.linkedin.com/in/mannbhardwaj/ http://rebellionrider.tumblr.com/ http://www.pinterest.com/rebellionrider/ ___Facebook Official Page___ https://www.facebook.com/RebellionRider.official/ You can also Email me at for E-mail address please check About section Please please LIKE and SHARE my videos it makes me happy. Thanks for liking, commenting, sharing and watching more of our videos This is Manish from RebellionRider.com ♥ I LOVE ALL MY VIEWERS AND SUBSCRIBERS
Views: 26278 Manish Sharma
Oracle SQL Tutorial 8 - Indexes - Database Design Primer 5
 
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The concept of an index is extremely important when managing a database. An index has the power of making your database very quick or it has the power to bog down your update, delete, and insert statements. The trick is to find a good balance. You will want to index any columns that are used continually in a select or a join. By default, all primary keys are indexed as well as any columns with the UNIQUE column attribute. I suggest you consider adding an index to your foreign keys as these will often be used in joins as well. You can actually create an index on a group of columns. This will allow you to search for data and return multiple columns. This is known as a composite index. There are many other things to database design...much more than we have covered. I have decided I will cover these as we go so that we can start applying what we learn practically. Support me: http://www.patreon.com/calebcurry Subscribe to my newsletter: http://eepurl.com/-8qtH Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Additional Links~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ More content: http://CalebCurry.com Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://twitter.com/calebCurry Amazing Web Hosting - https://www.dreamhost.com/r.cgi?1487063 (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 13013 Caleb Curry
Reverse Key Index :Types of Btree Index in Oracle
 
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Please subscribe to my new channel. https://www.youtube.com/c/AnIndianAbroadd The Videos explains how Reverse Btree Index works and in what condition they shall be used. Reverse Btree index are used to solve index block contention. You can't perform range scans in reverse btree Index.
Views: 898 Tech Coach
Local Vs Global Partitioned Index in Oracle 11g
 
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The Video Explains the difference between Local Partitioned Indexes(Prefixed vs Non Prefixed Indexes). and Global Partitioned Index along with the challenges in maintaining Global partitioned Indexes when the underlying tables partitioned is dropped/truncated/Merged/Moved. Local Partitioned Index Shares the same boundaries as the table and are in the same number as table partitions they are widely used in DSS and DWH systems. While Global Partitioned Index are predominantly used in OLTP systems
Views: 2975 Tech Coach
Why do we need Bit Map Index
 
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Internals of Bitmap Indexes in Oracle For Full Course Experience Please Go To http://mentorsnet.org/course_preview?course_id=6 Full Course Experience Includes 1. Access to course videos and exercises 2. View & manage your progress/pace 3. In-class projects and code reviews 4. Personal guidance from your Mentors
Views: 43516 Oresoft LWC
Indexes in Oracle :Index Scan Methods :Part 2
 
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The Video Explains when should you create indexes. The difference between Simple and composite Index, Relevance of order in composite indexes and Index Scan Methods in detail. 1.Index Unique scan 2.Index Range Scan 3. Index Skip Scan 4. Fast full Index Scan 5. Full Index Scan If you have any questions just drop in a comment
Views: 3191 Tech Coach
Oracle Tutorial || Online Training || Adv Sql | Index Organized Table Part - 1 by basha
 
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DURGASOFT is INDIA's No.1 Software Training Center offers online training on various technologies like JAVA, .NET , ANDROID,HADOOP,TESTING TOOLS ,ADF,INFORMATICA,TABLEAU,IPHONE,OBIEE,ANJULAR JS, SAP... courses from Hyderabad & Bangalore -India with Real Time Experts. Mail us your requirements to [email protected] so that our Supporting Team will arrange Demo Sessions. Ph:Call +91-8885252627,+91-7207212428,+91-7207212427,+91-8096969696. http://durgasoft.com http://durgasoftonlinetraining.com https://www.facebook.com/durgasoftware http://durgajobs.com https://www.facebook.com/durgajobsinfo......
Index organised tables and heap tables, creating index organised tables
 
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Index organised tables and heap tables, creating index organised tables For Students of B.Tech, B.E, MCA, BCA, B.Sc., M.Sc., Courses - As Per IP University Syllabus and Other Engineering Courses
How to create Virtual Columns in Oracle Database
 
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How to create Virtual Columns in Oracle Database 12c When queried, virtual columns appear to be normal table columns, but their values are derived rather than being stored on disc. The syntax for defining a virtual column is listed below. column_name [datatype] [GENERATED ALWAYS] AS (expression) [VIRTUAL] If the datatype is omitted, it is determined based on the result of the expression. The GENERATED ALWAYS and VIRTUAL keywords are provided for clarity only. The script below creates and populates an employees table with two levels of commission. It includes two virtual columns to display the commission-based salary. The first uses the most abbreviated syntax while the second uses the most verbose form. CREATE TABLE employees ( id NUMBER, first_name VARCHAR2(10), last_name VARCHAR2(10), salary NUMBER(9,2), comm1 NUMBER(3), comm2 NUMBER(3), salary1 AS (ROUND(salary*(1+comm1/100),2)), salary2 NUMBER GENERATED ALWAYS AS (ROUND(salary*(1+comm2/100),2)) VIRTUAL, CONSTRAINT employees_pk PRIMARY KEY (id) ); INSERT INTO employees (id, first_name, last_name, salary, comm1, comm2) VALUES (1, 'JOHN', 'DOE', 100, 5, 10); INSERT INTO employees (id, first_name, last_name, salary, comm1, comm2) VALUES (2, 'JAYNE', 'DOE', 200, 10, 20); COMMIT; Querying the table shows the inserted data plus the derived commission-based salaries. SELECT * FROM employees; ID FIRST_NAME LAST_NAME SALARY COMM1 COMM2 SALARY1 SALARY2 ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- ---------- 1 JOHN DOE 100 5 10 105 110 2 JAYNE DOE 200 10 20 220 240 2 rows selected. SQL The expression used to generate the virtual column is listed in the DATA_DEFAULT column of the [DBA|ALL|USER]_TAB_COLUMNS views. COLUMN data_default FORMAT A50 SELECT column_name, data_default FROM user_tab_columns WHERE table_name = 'EMPLOYEES'; COLUMN_NAME DATA_DEFAULT ------------------------------ -------------------------------------------------- ID FIRST_NAME LAST_NAME SALARY COMM1 COMM2 SALARY1 ROUND("SALARY"*(1+"COMM1"/100),2) SALARY2 ROUND("SALARY"*(1+"COMM2"/100),2) 8 rows selected. SQL Notes and restrictions on virtual columns include: 1)Indexes defined against virtual columns are equivalent to function-based indexes. 2)Virtual columns can be referenced in the WHERE clause of updates and deletes, but they cannot be manipulated by DML. 3)Tables containing virtual columns can still be eligible for result caching. 4)Functions in expressions must be deterministic at the time of table creation, but can subsequently be recompiled and made non-deterministic without invalidating the virtual column. In such cases the following steps must be taken after the function is recompiled: a)Constraint on the virtual column must be disabled and re-enabled. b)Indexes on the virtual column must be rebuilt. c)Materialized views that access the virtual column must be fully refreshed. d)The result cache must be flushed if cached queries have accessed the virtual column. e)Table statistics must be regathered. 5)Virtual columns are not supported for index-organized, external, object, cluster, or temporary tables. 6)The expression used in the virtual column definition has the following restrictions: a.It cannot refer to another virtual column by name. b.It can only refer to columns defined in the same table. c.If it refers to a deterministic user-defined function, it cannot be used as a partitioning key column. e.The output of the expression must be a scalar value. It cannot return an Oracle supplied datatype, a user-defined type, or LOB or LONG RAW.
Views: 343 OracleDBA
DBMS Indexing: The Basic Concept
 
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A quick introduction to the concept of indexing in RDBMSs
Views: 144344 Brian Finnegan
Oracle Tutorial - How to add virtual column in oracle 11g
 
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Hello friends in this video i'm going to demonstrate you how to add virtual column in ORACLE 11g step by step. Oracle 11g supports virtual columns which are derived from the other columns in the table. You can use the virtual columns in your queries, you can index them, you can collect the statistics, etc. There are few restrictions on the virtual columns. You cannot write/insert the data into virtual columns. There is no support for index_organized, external, object, cluster, temporary tables.
Views: 1201 OCP Technology
Clustered vs. Nonclustered Index Structures in SQL Server
 
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Clustered and nonclustered indexes share many of the same internal structures, but they're fundamentally different in nature. Watch Microsoft Certified IT Professional Jon Seigel explain the similarities and differences of clustered and nonclustered indexes, using a real-world example to show how these structures work to improve the performance of SQL queries. Blog post on primary key vs. the clustered index: http://voluntarydba.com/post/2012/10/02/The-Primary-Key-vs-The-Clustered-Index.aspx CREATE INDEX statement reference: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms188783.aspx ALTER INDEX statement reference: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms188388.aspx Index navigation internals by example: http://sqlblog.com/blogs/paul_white/archive/2011/08/09/sql-server-seeks-and-binary-search.aspx Sample index data is from the AdventureWorksLT2008R2 sample database: http://awlt2008dbscript.codeplex.com/releases/view/46169 Visit my channel for more database administration videos: https://www.youtube.com/voluntarydba Subscribe to get notified about my latest videos: https://www.youtube.com/voluntarydba?sub_confirmation=1 Read additional content on my blog: http://voluntarydba.com Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/voluntarydba Like on Facebook: https://facebook.com/voluntarydba
Views: 254424 Voluntary DBA
mysql tutorial for beginners (6/8) : Indexes
 
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mysql tutorial for beginners (6/8) : Indexes As things stand, the table students works and can be searched without problem by MySQL—until it grows to more than a couple of hundred rows, At that point, database accesses will get slower and slower with every new row added, because MySQL has to search through every row whenever a query is issued. This is like searching through every book in a library whenever you need to look something up. Of course, you don’t have to search libraries that way, because they have either a card index system or, most likely, a database of their own. The way to achieve fast searches is to add an index, either when creating a table or at any time afterward. But the decision is not so simple. For example, there are different index types such as a regular INDEX, PRIMARY KEY, and FULLTEXT. Also, you must decide which columns require an index, a judgment that requires you to predict whether you will be searching any of the data in that column. And even when you’ve decided that, you still have the option of reducing index size by limiting the amount of each column to be indexed. If we imagine the searches that may be made on the students table, it becomes apparent that all of the columns may need to be searched. Anyway, go ahead and add an index to each of the columns, using the commands: ALTER TABLE students ADD INDEX(name(3)); An alternative to using ALTER TABLE to add an index is to use the CREATE INDEX command. They are equivalent, except that CREATE INDEX cannot be used for creating a PRIMARY KEY CREATE INDEX surname ON students (surname(5)); DESCRIBE students; These commands create indexes on both the name and surname columns, limiting name index to only the first 3 characters, and surname index to the first 5 characters. For instance, when MySQL indexes the following name: SAFAA It will actually store in the index only the first 3 characters: SAF This is done to minimize the size of the index, and to optimize database access speed. DESCRIBE command shows the key MUL for each column. This key means that multiple occurrences of a value may occur within that column, which is exactly what we want, as name or surname may appear many times. You don’t have to wait, until after creating a table to add indexes. In fact, doing so can be time-consuming, as adding an index to a large table can take a very long time. Therefore, let’s look at a command that creates the table students with indexes already in place. CREATE TABLE students ( Id_studnet SMALLINT UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT, name VARCHAR(10) NOT NULL, surname VARCHAR(20) NOT NULL, email VARCHAR(30) NOT NULL, INDEX(name(3)), INDEX(surname(5)), ,PRIMARY KEY(id_studnet),UNIQUE(email)); Another important index, PK, its single unique key for each student to enable instant accessing of a row. The importance of having a key with a unique value for each row will come up when we start to combine data from different tables. You can add PK, while you create the table at the first time, or later by issuing the following command: ALTER TABLE students ADD PRIMARY KEY(id_student); The last important index, FULLTEXT index Unlike a regular index, MySQL’s FULLTEXT allows super-fast searches of entire columns of text. It stores every word in every data string in a special index that you can search using “natural language,” in a similar manner to using a search engine. It’s not strictly true that MySQL stores all the words in a FULLTEXT index, because it has a built-in list of more than 500 words that it chooses to ignore because they are so common that they aren’t very helpful for searching anyway. This list, called stopwords, includes the, as, is, of, and so on. The list helps MySQL run much more quickly when performing a FULLTEXT search and keeps database sizes down. FULLTEXT indexes can be created for CHAR, VARCHAR, and TEXT columns only. A FULLTEXT index definition can be given in the CREATE TABLE statement when a table is created, or added later using ALTER TABLE (or CREATE INDEX). Adding a FULLTEXT index to the table students for the columns name and surname ALTER TABLE classics ADD FULLTEXT(name,surname); this index is in addition to the ones already created and does not affect them You can now perform FULLTEXT searches across this pair of columns. If you find that MySQL is running slower than you think it should be when accessing your database, the problem is usually related to your indexes. Either you don’t have an index where you need one, or the indexes are not optimally designed. Tweaking a table’s indexes will often solve such a problem. In the next tutorial, we will learn about, using FOREIGN KEY Constraints and how to join tables together. Subscribe for more: ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=saf3al2a SWE.Safaa Al-Hayali - saf3al2a
Views: 22238 Safaa Al-Hayali
Which Order Should Columns Go in an Index?: Finding All the Red Sweets Part 4
 
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When you create an index on multiple columns there's an important question you need to answer: In which order should you list the columns? This video looks at some of the factors you should consider to help answer this question. ============================ The Magic of SQL with Chris Saxon Copyright © 2015 Oracle and/or its affiliates. Oracle is a registered trademark of Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Other names may be registered trademarks of their respective owners. Oracle disclaims any warranties or representations as to the accuracy or completeness of this recording, demonstration, and/or written materials (the “Materials”). The Materials are provided “as is” without any warranty of any kind, either express or implied, including without limitation warranties or merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, and non-infringement.
Views: 3329 The Magic of SQL
Database Design 39 - Indexes (Clustered, Nonclustered, Composite Index)
 
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This video covers the basics of indexes. Indexing is an extremely important step of database design. Without Indexes database queries can take a substantial amount of time and hog system resources. The main two classifications of indexes are clustered and non-clustered indexes. Clustered indexes are usually the primary key and determine how the data is actually stored in the table. These are the fastest and most effective. Non-clustered indexes sort a reference to data that is still fast but doesn't actually determine how the data is structured. The best tip I can give you is to use indexes but don't over use them. Having loads of indexes on columns that are barely ever in a where clause or join can bog down the database. This is because every time the table is updated the index must also be updated! When a database looks through a table for certain where conditions on a column that does not have an index, it does an entire table scan. This is not a good practice for large databases (or even small databases but not as bad). With an index the database will do an index seek and quickly find the data you are looking for. Composite indexes consist of two or more columns within one index. Use these when you plan on using the two columns together for a database query WHERE clause. Learn more about indexes here: https://www.calebcurry.com/blogs/database-design/introduction-to-indexes Donate!: http://bit.ly/DonateCTVM2. Courses for Download: http://www.udemy.com/u/calebcurry/ (Use the coupon code "YouTubeDiscount" without the quotes) Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/CalebTheVideoMaker Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CalebTheVideoMaker2 Twitter: http://Twitter.com/calebCurry Subscribe (it's free!): https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCZUyPT9DkJWmS_DzdOi7RIA?sub_confirmation=1 Amazing Web Hosting - https://www.dreamhost.com/r.cgi?1487063 (The best web hosting for a cheap price!)
Views: 82081 Caleb Curry
Oracle - SQL - Alter Table
 
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Oracle - SQL - Alter Table Watch more Videos at https://www.tutorialspoint.com/videotutorials/index.htm Lecture By: Mr. Anadi Sharma, Tutorials Point India Private Limited.
PL/SQL tutorial 51: How To Create Nested Table collection in PL/SQL Block
 
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RebellionRider presents PL/SQL tutorial 51 on how to create a Nested table in Oracle Database by Manish Sharma ------------------------------------------------------------------------ ►►►LINKS◄◄◄ Blog: http://bit.ly/nested-table-1 Previous Tutorial ► For Loop: https://youtu.be/DfAmnj2j7WI ------------------------------------------------------------------------- ►Make sure you SUBSCRIBE and be the 1st one to see my videos! ------------------------------------------------------------------------- ►►►Find me on Social Media◄◄◄ Follow What I am up to as it happens on https://twitter.com/rebellionrider http://instagram.com/rebellionrider https://plus.google.com/+Rebellionrider http://in.linkedin.com/in/mannbhardwaj/ ___Facebook Official Page of Manish Sharma___ https://www.facebook.com/TheRebellionRider/ ___Facebook Official Page of RebellionRider.com___ https://www.facebook.com/RebellionRider.official/ You can also Email me at for E-mail address please check the About section Please please LIKE and SHARE my videos it makes me happy. Thanks for liking, commenting, sharing and watching more of our videos This is Manish from RebellionRider.com ♥ I LOVE ALL MY VIEWERS AND SUBSCRIBERS
Views: 17408 Manish Sharma
B*Tree Index Types (Indexes in Oracle-2)
 
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This video will cover different types of B-tree indexes: Descending index,Reverse key index,Key Compressed Index B-tree cluster index,Index Organized Table(IOT):
Views: 15087 Anindya Das
26/125 Oracle PLSQL: Index by Tables-Associative Arrays 2
 
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تعلم اوراكل حتى الاحتراف Learn Oracle PLSQL
Views: 684 khaled alkhudari
SelectTec | Aula Nº 28 | Create Index - Oracle SQL Developer
 
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create index syntax: create unique index nome_indice tabela(colula)
Views: 1352 SelectTec
Oracle Database11g tutorials 14 : How to CREATE TABLE using sql developer and command prompt
 
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Oracle Database11g tutorials 14 How to Create table using command prompt and Create table using sql developer Blog Link http://bit.ly/1TkY4Oe Time Line 0:25 Introduction of Tables in Database 1:03 What is Create Table (Introduction of create table) 1:30 Syntax of Create Table 2:08 How to create table using Command Prompt 4:55 How to create table using SQL Developer Links for Oracle Database tutorials 4: database connectivity using SQL developer and command prompt http://youtu.be/wSqoXRlXDUU You can have indepth knowledge about SQL create table here http://www.rebellionrider.com/sql-create-table.html Tool used in this tutorial is command prompt. This tutorial series is part of SQL expert exam certification training. if you are preparing for SQL certification you can use my tutorials. This SQL Tutorial is a part of free training. Copy Cloud referral link || Use this link to join copy cloud and get 20GB of free storage https://copy.com?r=j7eYO7 Contacts E-Mail [email protected] Twitter https://twitter.com/rebellionrider Instagram http://instagram.com/rebellionrider Facebook. https://www.facebook.com/imthebhardwaj Linkedin. http://in.linkedin.com/in/mannbhardwaj/ Thanks for linking, commenting, sharing and watching more of our videos This is Manish from RebellionRider.com Today in this oracle database tutorial we will see How to CREATE A TABLE. if we have to define a table in layman language then we can say that Tables are just a collection of Rows and Columns but In RDBMS tables are database objects which help in organizing data into ROWS and COLUMNS. We can also say that SQL tables are kind of data structure which are used by database for efficient storage of data. To create a table in our database we use SQL CREATE TABLE command. SQL CREATE TABLE is a type of DATA DEFINITION LANGUAGE also known as DDL. To Create a table in your schema you will require CREATE TABLE system privilege. In our future videos we will see what are system and object privileges and how to grant them to a user. Today for this video we will be using Sample schema HR which already has all the necessary privileges. Ohk Let's see the syntax. CREATE TABLE table name ( column name1 Data-Type(size), column name2 Data-Type(size), ..... ); CREATE TABLE is an oracle reserved word or say an Oracle key word whereas There are 3 different ways of creating a table in Oracle database. Creating a table using Command Line Interface (CLI) in Oracle database For demonstrating how to create table in oracle database using CLI, I'll be using Command prompt. Thats how we create table using command prompt. you can check your table structure by DESCRIBE command for that just write DESC and your table name. Like this Another way of creating a table is by using Graphic user interface (GUI) in Oracle database To demonstrate how to create table using GUI we will use SQL developer. Lets open our SQL developer I am connected to HR schema if you do not know how to create a connection to database using SQL developer please watch my oracle database tutorial 4 that explains database connectivity using SQL developer and command prompt. Link for this video is in the description below. So lets create a table. Creating a table using SQL developer is very easy we do not have to fire any query here. Let's start First of all right click on your connection in which you want to create a table and choose schema browser. This will open a separate schema browser pane or you can expend your connection by clicking this + sign and then right click on table and choose New Table. However I prefer working with schema browser so let's skip to schema browser pane here from the first drop-down list you can choose connection name and in the second drop down list you can choose what database objects you want to work with we want to create a table thus I'll choose table and then click this arrow here and choose option for new table Ok we have created a table wizard first of all give a unique name to your table and add some column as well. For this, click the green plus button. Now we already have a column so give it some name. Also choose a datatype from the list and specify any size you can check this not null column if in case you want to make this a mandatory column you can also specify default value and constraint If you want to make this column a primary key you can click here In my future video i'll show you what are these constraints and different ways of applying them on a column in a table. for this video we will concentrate on create table only so when you are done with all your columns click ok Thats your table You can double click on your table here and can see its structure. Thats it
Views: 156960 Manish Sharma